Food & Nutrition

9 Ways You Can Literally Lose Weight In Your Sleep

Shut off all screens

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Before you get ready for bed, shut down all bedroom electronics. Manchester University researchers found that short-wavelength blue light, which is emitted tablets and smartphones, disrupts the body’s production of melatonin and, as a result, could disrupt metabolism. Set yourself a cut-off for before-bed television time, too. Singapore researchers linked long television screen time with higher levels of triglycerides (associated with metabolic syndrome and diabetes) and lower adiponectin (a protein involved in regulating glucose levels and fatty acid breakdown).

Give yourself a bedtime

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You know you need to get enough sleep, but somehow a busy schedule—or a new TV season—always gets in the way of your beauty rest. Here’s motivation to hit the sack on time: By committing to a healthy number of snoozing hours per night (the Mayo Clinic recommends 7 to 8 hours), you burn more calories throughout the day—even when you’re inactive. An American Journal of Clinical Nutrition study found that well-rested people’s resting energy expenditure was 5 percent higher than that of their tired peers. They also burned 20 percent more calories after eating than sleep skimpers. Related research found that lack of sleep makes fat cells less sensitive to insulin, a metabolic change linked with obesity.

Cut out alcohol

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During REM sleep is when our bodies can burn the most calories. If you drink alcohol close to your bedtime your body will work to metabolize the alcohol as you sleep, keeping you from achieving a state of REM. A glass of wine with dinner is OK, but you should stop drinking alcohol three hours before you go to bed. Try these tricks to flatten you belly without exercise.

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